Alle Artikel mit dem Schlagwort: Academic Publishing

OSR182 Contributor Lists #oscibar [EN]

This is another episode from our coverage of the Barcamp Open Science. In this episode Bernd talked to Julien Colomb about how to identify, mark and give credit to contributors of scientific works. Link to the session pad.

OSR163 What Role Can Open Science Play in Enabling South-North Dialogues? (Poster Session) #osc2019 [EN]

This is a short interview episode from the poster session at the Open Science Conference 2019. In this episode Bernd talks to Johanna Havemann (@johave on Twitter), a (digital) science project manager as well as trainer and consultant in (Open) Science communication. Johanna gave a presentation on open source infrastructure for region- and discipline-specific preprint repositories and presented a poster on AfricArXiv, a free preprint service for African scientists.

OSR111 Move from trusted Platforms to P2P #oscibar [EN]

Lambert Heller (TIB) and Wolfgang Böttner (De Gruyter, OA journals for Societies) moderated a session on moving from traditional platforms to peer-to-peer networks as a basis for academic publishing. After the session they were so kind to share with us their impressions and main discussion points from the session.

OSR098 Academic Publishing Infrastructures with Björn Brembs [EN]

Something is rotten in the state of Denmark. Academic publishing that is. And actually not only in Denmark. Even though open access publishing has picked up quite a bit over the last years, academic publishing today is still rather dominated by legacy publishers who mainly play their old game without much signs of changing and adapting to current technological and scientific developments. In fact, many of them are not even showing much willingness to consider changing. A lot of the recent studies and arguments point out that a complete transition to open access publishing potentially yields many positive social effects for the academic system and society as a whole, and even might achieved quite substantial savings. We had the great opportunity to talk Björn Brembs about these points, the obstacles, the necessary steps and a vision of how a publishing infrastructure could look like.

We apologize for the less optimal audio quality and hope you’re still enjoying the conversation. Have fun!